Monday, July 9, 2012

Syamantaka Mani (part 3): Prasena Perishes

Jambavan kills the lion and takes Syamantaka mani
Photo Credit: The Jewel of Auspiciousness
by Angela Magnotti Andrews
Prasena Perishes

Soon after, Satrajit’s brother, Prasena, borrowed the gem to bring him favor and protection on a hunt in the wilderness. Wearing the stone around his collar, he set out on his noble steed in search of game.

Prasena left his horse to graze beneath a tree, which he climbed for a better view. He saw a lion approaching and took aim, only to suddenly find himself suddenly hanging from his neck by the necklace. A snake had fallen from an upper branch, surprising him and knocking him off balance, killing him in minutes.

The lion devoured Prasena and his horse, and captivated by the brilliance of light emanating from the gemstone, the lion clutched it between his teeth and carried it back toward his lair.

As the lion ambled down the path, Jambavan, King of the Bears, spotted the shiny treasure he carried in his mouth. Mesmerized by the stone, Jambavan ambushed the lion and killed him. Jambavan picked up the stone and carried it back to his den, where he gave it to his son for a toy.

The day closed and night set in, and the townspeople began to wonder after Prasena. “Where could he have gone? Something awful is sure to have happened.”

Word got back to Satrajit that his brother had not returned from the hunt, and Satrajit was suddenly overcome with suspicion. “He must have been cornered by Krishna for the stone. I shouldn’t have allowed him to go out with it so soon after Krishna’s lustful inquiry.”

Click here for part 2                                                                       Click here for part 4
BIBLIOGRAPHY
1. Prabhupada, A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami. Krsna: The Supreme Personality of Godhead. Juhu, Mumbai: Bhaktivedanta Book Trust, 1974.
2. Hudli, Anand. "Ganesha chaturthi, legends, and prayers." Hindu-Net. September 16, 1996. Accessed July 2012. http://www.hindunet.org/srh_home/1996_9/msg00099.html.
3. History and Mythology Blog. "ACK-119: Syamantaka Mani." Posted April 27, 2009. Accessed July 2012. http://hmindia.blogspot.com/2009/04/ack-119-syamantaka-mani.html.
4. Srhi2424. "Syamantaka Mani." HubPages. Last modified July 16, 2011. Accessed July 2012. http://shri2424.hubpages.com/hub/Syamantaka-Mani.

*Clip art courtesy of The Graphics Fairy

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